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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

4 edition of Legitimacy, sovereignty, and regime change in the South Pacific found in the catalog.

Legitimacy, sovereignty, and regime change in the South Pacific

comparisons between the Fiji coups and the Bougainville rebellion

by Peter Larmour

  • 66 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published by Political and Social Change, Research School of Pacific Studies, Australian National University in Canberra .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Fiji,
  • Bougainville Province (Papua New Guinea),
  • Oceania.
    • Subjects:
    • Legitimacy of governments -- Oceania.,
    • Sovereignty.,
    • Fiji -- Politics and government.,
    • Bougainville Province (Papua New Guinea) -- Politics and government.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementPeter Larmour.
      SeriesRegime change and regime maintenance in Asia and the Pacific,, no. 7
      ContributionsAustralian National University. Dept. of Political and Social Change.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsJQ6301.A58 L37 1992
      The Physical Object
      Pagination15 p. ;
      Number of Pages15
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL430039M
      ISBN 100731513444
      LC Control Number98137236
      OCLC/WorldCa30886156

      a part of external legitimacy which can include using ambassadors, establishing embassy, and signing treaties. Democracy government considered to rule with the consent of . In the South Pacific, the same word describes small dugouts used for river navigation, giant war vessels accommodating hundreds of men and 25m-long ocean-voyaging craft. Ocean-voyaging craft – either double canoes or single canoes with outriggers – carried .

        China’s inroads into the South Pacific have geopolitical significance, beyond the mustering of more supportive voices in international forums. The .   The South Pacific has once again become a region of great strategic competition and one worthy of much more attention. The United States would be wise to further invest in ensuring that the Pacific nations retain their independence, freedom, and sovereignty, not only for the sake of U.S. interests but also for the benefit of the citizens of.

        Where does the CCP’s legitimacy come from then? As Greer notes, maybe looking at the per capita distribution of wealth in China has been the wrong measure all along—it’s unnecessarily. which in turn reduces government legitimacy, reducing government effectiveness still further, and so on. What is legitimacy? The concept of legitimacy has been described as slippery and mushy.3 It means different things to different people. While an easy concept to grasp in general, it can be difficult to nail down to specifics. 1 Gilley, B.


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Legitimacy, sovereignty, and regime change in the South Pacific by Peter Larmour Download PDF EPUB FB2

regime changes. 'Ibis paper compares the two events, using idea about sovereignty and legitimacy. 'Ibis paper compares the two events, using idea about sovereignty and legitimacy. It examines the ideas generally, and in relatim to South Pacific politics, and then it summarizes the similarities and diffemx:es.

and draws some cooclusims about regime : Peter Larmour. Get this from a library. Legitimacy, sovereignty, and regime change in the South Pacific: comparisons between the Fiji coups and the Bougainville rebellion.

[Peter Larmour; Australian National University. Department of Political and Social Change.]. Culture sovereignty Sustainable Development in the Pacific Conference: Type: Book: Date Published: Date Created: Migration and development in the South Pacific.

Author(s)-Type: Book: Date Published- Legitimacy, Sovereignty and Regime Change in the South Pacific: Comparisons Between the Fiji Coups and the Bougainville Rebellion. The grounding of legitimacy in constitutional assent Although modern law locates sovereignty in the people and seeks to treat every member of society equally before the law, the constitutions of Pacific island states were rarely founded on consent by the people.

On the contrary, most states in theFile Size: 84KB. Abstract. From the conception of society, there followed almost logically the Saint-Simonian political authoritarianism.

Paradoxically, despite their condemnation of the critical spirit of the age, the political views of the Saint-Simonians, set forth in the Doctrine, were elaborated less in systematic exposition than by implication in the criticism of existing political ideas and : Georg G.

Iggers. Chinese parallel title on jacket romanized as: Hsiang-kang ti cheng chih pien hua chi cheng fu ho fa hsing chih wei chi. Bibliography: p. Sincethe PAP has used precisely-timed elections to Legitimacy one or more mandate types from citizens and, by extension, claim legitimacy.

In particular, it has sort a mandate based on its response to an event, execution of a policy and/or collection of a : Lee Morgenbesser.

(). The autocratic mandate: elections, legitimacy and regime stability in Singapore. The Pacific Review: Vol. 30, No. 2, pp. Cited by: This book is about issues of' governance' and 'good government' in the South Pacific, a region of small developing countries which are still relatively dependent on foreign aid.

Issues of good governance are prominent in the recent unrest over the Sandline mercenaries contract in Papua New Guinea and in the review of Fiji's constitution that led.

SECTION 1: THE CONTEXT OF CHANGE 1. Modernisation and Development in the South Pacific Vijay Naidu 7 SECTION 2: CORRUPTION 2. Corruption Robert Hughes 35 3. Governance, Legitimacy and the Rule of Law in the South Pacific Graham Hassall 51 4. The Vanuatu Ombudsman Edward R. Hill 71 SECTION 3: CUSTOMARY LAW 5.

Custom Then and Now: The Changing. This aptly expresses the crux of the issue: there is more to state legitimacy than mere empirical existence.

This chapter addresses the crisis of state legitimacy in Pacific nations, manifested in public disorder, coups, the collapse of law and order, corruption, state capture, violation of human rights. Start studying Pol Science chapter 2.

Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Search. enhances sovereignty and legitimacy. origins of modern state (pg) appeared and developed in europe experienced constant military coups and a quasi-fascist regime-modernizing authoritarian military regime.

In fact, there is no doubt that the days are over where the South Pacific was solely un-der the influence of the West.

The Chinese government has sagely and deftly turned the waning interest of European countries and the U.S. in the region, which reflects world-wide economic structural changes in the context of a changing international division of. Political Legitimacy in Singapore.

The long and successful marriage between high capitalism and modern authoritarianism in the case of Singapore poses a legitimacy puzzle. While the authoritarian regime has enjoyed and continues to enjoy broad-based support, the depth of its legitimacy. The countries of Southeast Asia, most of which won their independence after World War II, have had varying degrees of success in establishing governments and political systems that in the eyes of their citizens have achieved political legitimacy - that is, are seen to have the right to rule.

Because these countries have much in common and at the same time differ in important ways - with their 5/5(1). James likewise claimed: ‘What sovereignty refers to is the presence, within a governed community, of supreme legal authority—so that such a community can be said to possess sovereignty, or to be sovereign, if it does not look beyond its own borders for the ultimate source of its own legitimacy.’Cited by:   Sovereignty - It is the legitimate power of a country to govern itself without the interference of any other country.

Example: Independent India is a Sovereign whereas British India was not a sovereign. Authority - It simply means legitimate power. Sovereignty Discourse in East Asia: Exploring Alternate sources of Legitimacy A Conference Paper for ISA Hong Kong By Lonnie Edge Hankuk University of Foreign Studies Abstract: Sovereignty, often a concept taken for granted in IR, typically focuses on the Weberian definition requiring the monopoly over the use of force within a territory.

on The New Pacific Diplomacy held at the University of the South Pacific (USP) in early December We would like to thank the School of Government, Development and International Affairs at the USP and especially Professor Vijay Naidu, then Head of File Size: 2MB.

Joseph Raz delivered the second Frederic R. and Molly S. Kellogg Biennial Lecture in Jurisprudence on the subject of "Sovereignty & Legitimacy: On the Changing Face of. The University of the South Pacific has supported this conference, and the concept of establishing an ongoing Pacific Constitutions Research Network in order to directly develop research outputs that can be used to inform current member country discussions about constitutional reform and to increase USP’s visibility and capacity in the area of constitutions and governance, which in turn will.Democratic Sovereignty: Authority, Legitimacy, and State in a Globalizing Age [Matthew S.

Weinert] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Democratic Sovereignty: Authority, Legitimacy, and State in a Globalizing AgeCited by: 7.Regime legitimacy, as I define it in this thesis, exists when citizens support their regime because they believe it has a moral right to rule over them (Gilley a:3).